Planting Partner

Grow-Trees


Grow-Trees.com is a social enterprise launched on world environment day (2010) and dedicated to a better planet.  They aim to inculcate the practice of planting trees amongst companies and a gift to honour or cherish someone. Their unique system allows one to locate their tree(s) on Google Maps at the tree planting project location. 

Over 1,680,000 trees have been planted so far creating over 139,000 workdays of jobs in places like Kumbhalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary (Rajasthan), and Chintamani (Karnataka) community lands. Areas such as the the periphery of tiger reserves at Kanha National Park (M.P.), Sariska (Rajasthan) and the Unesco World Heritage site of Sundarbans National Park are also part of their reforestation projects.  The projects are audited by accounting firms and periodic site inspections. These trees create rural jobs. They provide flowers, fruit, fodder and fuel to communities and domestic animals. Their presence promotes biodiversity, prevents soil erosion, improves water catchment areas, generates oxygen, reduces carbon in the atmosphere and fights climate change. 

 

 Sundarbans Project - West Bengal

 

Purpose:

Trees for Forests and Wildlife

Location:

Periphery of Sundarbans National Park, South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India

Local Flora & Fauna:

The tree species planted here include jat bain, payara bain, kalo bain, kankra, garjan, pasur and math garan. The animals species found here include the tiger, wild boar, jungle cat, rhesus macaque, otter, pangolin and fox. The crocodile, python Gangetic dolphin and marine turtles are also found here.

There are over 100 bird species found here including the small minivet, black-hooded oriole, mangrove whistler, and northern eagle owl.

Impact:

This project involves planting 100,000 mangroves in the periphery of Sundarbans National Park in West Bengal. Sundarbans is the largest deltaic mangrove forest in the world with an area of 10,200 sq km area. The Sundarbans is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and it is located at the mouth of the Ganges and Brahmaputra Rivers between India and Bangladesh. Its forest and waterways support a wide range of fauna including a number of species threatened with extinction.

Sundarbans is home to many poor communities who are largely migrant and landless. Apart from external threats such as cyclones, floods and sea level rise,the premature and ill-planned establishment of settlements, rapid population growth along with habitat destruction are creating more demand on the natural resources (fisheries, water, forests, agricultural soil and land) which are already under stress.

The planting of mangroves around villages in the Periphery of the National Park will create jobs in the nursery and planting activities, directly support rural livelihoods, improve fisheries catch, provide flowers, fruit, fodder and fuel to rural communities and living creatures, and benefit wildlife including the endangered Tiger.

 

Udaipur Project - Rajasthan

 

Purpose: 

Trees for Rural Communities 

Location:

Villages of Borawali Madri, Dhol, Kamol,Tegra, Karech, Thadi Beri and Dhimdi, in Udaipur, Rajasthan, India.

Local Flora & Fauna:

The tree species which are planted here include bamboo, jambul, karanj, khair, siris, imli and mahua. The bird and animal species include golden oriole, grey pigeon, bulbul, aravali red spurfowl, grey junglefowl, leopard, hare and jungle cat.

Impact:

This project positively impacts the lives of 3500 villagers (almost 650 households). Nearly every household in each village participated in the planting or seeding activity. Members of the community institutions entrusted with the monitoring and supervising of operations played an effective role in ensuring good quality of work. Tribal communities form most of the population and their active involvement has not only helped prevent conflicts, but also contributed to the success of efforts in the regeneration of degraded forest areas, soil and water conservation/recharge, improving farm productivity and exploring  other avenues of sustainable livelihood patterns.